Todd, as a Wealthy Affiliate member, I have known about Jaaxy for a while, but never fancied spending the membership money whilst I had access to the keyword search tool offered by Wealthy Affiliate. However, I have now started piloting Jaaxy on the first 30 free searches, and boy if you are right! It is truly a powerful tool, which not only enables a genuine keyword search which reflects Serp ranking on the major SEO (and I have tested this myself by ‘playing about’ with keywords on these platforms), but it also offers website ranking, which for the same price you never find on alternative keyword search tools available on the market. To me, this in itself is a winning combination – definitely worth the upgrade to Pro membership!
The pages on your site that are long form content or are the key pages - must have Outbound Links to other "authority Sites" and pages in your industry or niche. By no means should you link to your competitors pages - but Google is rewarding pages that understand which other authority pages exist in its niche - and pull them into a "link cluster". back in the days we were all scared to link out to ther sites - fearing that our link juice will leak out. However, this is not the case and Google is rewarding people for sharing other authority and relevant content online.
If the pages you’ve created don’t rank for the keywords you’ve selected, you should re-evaluate your content strategy and adjust. If your page isn’t generating organic traffic, focus on less competitive keywords. Unfortunately in reality this is pretty common. The good thing is, you’ve collected a lot of actual keyword data at this stage. Adjust your keyword strategy and use this data in your advantage.      
It’s important to note that entire websites don’t rank for keywords — pages do. With big brands, we often see the homepage ranking for many keywords, but for most websites this isn’t usually the case. Many websites receive more organic traffic to pages other than the homepage, which is why it’s so important to diversify your website’s pages by optimizing each for uniquely valuable keywords.

For high-volume searches, keyword selection tools are usually quite efficient. Conversely, when the volume is low, the results are often misleading or near zero. In 2004, Google engineer Amit Singhal announced that over 50% of searches on Google were unique. Also, a 2009 study showed a 22% increase in the length of the search strings of 8 words or more.
If we do a search for “chili recipe” on Pinterest, they’ll give us a related search bar. See all those colored boxes with single words? These words help you build keyword phrases to use in your blog post and Pinterest marketing! Try tacking on keywords by clicking the boxes until Pinterest gives you no more suggestions. This will give you a super-detailed longtail keyword that you can use in your pin description.

You can find broken internal links from within the Search Console. You need to attend to each warning appropriately telling Google that you have fixed it. Having excessive 404s will hurt your site if they are really 404s, because anyone could escalate the 404s by pointing randomly to pages that don't exist from external places, which is why this is not that big of a deal - but should be looked at.
Negative SEO is basically when someone sends a ton of spammy, low quality backlinks to your site. The goal is to get Google to think your site is low quality because of all the crappy sites linking to you, and eventually devalue your site. There are actual companies that get paid to do negative SEO on behalf of their clients. It sucks, but it's reality.

In Chapter 2, we learned about SERP features. That background is going to help us understand how searchers want to consume information for a particular keyword. The format in which Google chooses to display search results depends on intent, and every query has a unique one. Google describes these intents in their Quality Rater Guidelines as either “know” (find information), “do” (accomplish a goal), “website” (find a specific website), or “visit-in-person” (visit a local business).
There’s always more than one way to ask a question. Consider synonyms and semantic variations on keywords describing your services. Google’s RankBrain technology recognizes synonyms and expands their search results accordingly. Google also punishes websites for stuffing their content with repetitive keywords. Synonyms and variations can help you to reach a larger audience and avoid Google penalties for keyword stuffing.
The higher the search volume for a given keyword or keyword phrase, the more work is typically required to achieve higher rankings. This is often referred to as keyword difficulty and occasionally incorporates SERP features; for example, if many SERP features (like featured snippets, knowledge graph, carousels, etc) are clogging up a keyword’s result page, difficulty will increase. Big brands often take up the top 10 results for high-volume keywords, so if you’re just starting out on the web and going after the same keywords, the uphill battle for ranking can take years of effort.

Just because a phrase didn’t appear in either of these tools doesn’t mean there is no demand for it. There are other ways to confirm that someone is interested in this topic. And for the blog posts and articles that target the informational keyphrases, we aren’t necessarily looking for huge demand. Any visibility in search can make a big difference in the performance of a post.

3) KWFinder is one of the "newer" kids on the block, but it's probably just about the easiest way I have found to find new long-tail keywords quickly. A couple of things I like about this tool is that it allows me to create lists of keywords. So I can group up my different sites by lists and revisit them at a later date. I can export the data to CSV and start building out campaigns. It also keeps a nice scrolling list of the last 20+ keywords you have looked up. The SEO difficulty indicator comes in very handy as well! As far as ease of use goes, KWFinder wins hands down.
I’ve found google trends to be an interesting way to see if a keyword (and by extension a niche) is growing or shrinking, and whether it’s seasonal or not. I can’t think of any other tool out there that can reliably tell you this information, so that’s really useful. Also, if you’re building a site, especially an authority site, getting onto something that’s trending upwards is a fantastic idea.
Negative SEO is basically when someone sends a ton of spammy, low quality backlinks to your site. The goal is to get Google to think your site is low quality because of all the crappy sites linking to you, and eventually devalue your site. There are actual companies that get paid to do negative SEO on behalf of their clients. It sucks, but it's reality.
Given you have a good idea of where to start and are fairly confident you are speaking the same language as your client, jump start research by generating related keyphrases and long tail variants with the ever so easy to use Google Autocomplete. This tool makes predictions based on what you are typing that are a reflection of Google search activity.
Do you want to learn how to perform stealth competitor research, find profitable keywords, audit paid ad campaigns, dissect your competitor's content strategies, perform backlink analysis, keyword rank tracking and identify site monetization opportunities? Download "The Ultimate SEMrush Playbook" below and get access to 34 stealth competitor research strategies... 

To answer your final question, yes but not really. You can definitely use AdWord keyword planner tool to get solid organic search volume estimates. However, don’t just stop there. Leverage other tools to find longer tail variations you can map against various stages of the buyer journey. I like to use SEMrush, Keyword Tool.io and Google autosuggest.
When you purchase something from this website, I may receive an affiliate commission.The Articles and pages on this site are my opinions and are not representative of the companies that create these products. My reviews are based on my own experience and research. I never recommend poor quality products or create false reviews to make sales. It is my intention to explain products or services so you can make an informed decision on which ones suit your needs best.
We also have a very unique “Local Search” only keyword search that cross references the populations of all towns and cities in USA, Canada & UK. So you can put in a search like “plumber” then choose to see all the cities in “California” with a population of between 50k – 100k and it will spit out plumber suggestions attached to the locale. Pretty neat.
Once you’re done getting the trust, you’ll want to ensure that your content resonates with your audience and other bloggers. As we know, every of our content on the web is meant for the end user. That said, a good website is bound to see more traffic, better links, higher retention rate, more shares and smaller bounce rates. The bottom line; off-page analysis gives you a better picture of the impression your site leaves on users.
When you purchase something from this website, I may receive an affiliate commission.The Articles and pages on this site are my opinions and are not representative of the companies that create these products. My reviews are based on my own experience and research. I never recommend poor quality products or create false reviews to make sales. It is my intention to explain products or services so you can make an informed decision on which ones suit your needs best.
Below is the estimated scale for SEO competitiveness. Again, this is all based on just general guidelines. Use these though! I follow these quite closely actually and they do work. After writing hundreds of posts based on SEO scores from KWFinder, I can tell you that I stand behind them 100%. A lot of times if I find a keyword that is easy or super easy to rank for, I will be on 1st page of Google within a week of posting.
Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.

Keyword research is an important part of SEO, because it will help you to understand the interests of your customers. Based on this knowledge, you’re able to identify  keyword opportunities in your industry that will help you to write successful online content. By doing your keyword research the right way, your able to have a positive impact on your content performance. Translating into higher rankings, better content engagement and a higher conversion rate. 
How do you go about a Pagination? You have to simply place the attributes: rel=”prev” and rel=”next” in the head of each page in the series. Perform an audit by using an SEO Spider tool. While doing this, make sure that the attributes serve its purpose and that is to establish a relationship between the interconnected URLs that directs the user to the most relevant content that they need. 

The higher the search volume for a given keyword or keyword phrase, the more work is typically required to achieve higher rankings. This is often referred to as keyword difficulty and occasionally incorporates SERP features; for example, if many SERP features (like featured snippets, knowledge graph, carousels, etc) are clogging up a keyword’s result page, difficulty will increase. Big brands often take up the top 10 results for high-volume keywords, so if you’re just starting out on the web and going after the same keywords, the uphill battle for ranking can take years of effort.
There are a ton of tools available to check backlinks. Moz, ahrefs, Majestic and plenty more. But most of these more well-known products have something in common--They're pricey. On top of that, most of them are enterprise level so the average blogger just starting out doesn't have the budget for it. So I set out to find an alternative. Enter Monitor Backlinks.
Great Top 10 keyword research tools list. Thank you for posting Robbie! I really appreciated the feedback from the experts. There are a definitely a few tools here worthy of taking note of. I have also been using DYNO Mapper (http://www.dynomapper.com) as a keyword research tool. DYNO Mapper is a visual sitemap generator that delivers keywords on all pages of any site. The user simply inputs any existing URL into the system and it will scan thousands of pages.

ccTLD plays a role in stating which specific search market/location your site wants to rank in. Some examples of ccTLD would be websites ending in .ph, .au, etc. instead of the more neutral .com. If your website is example.ph, then you can expect that you’ll rank for Google.com.ph and you’ll have a hard time ranking for international search engines like Google.com.au. If you have TLDs that are neutral (.com, .org, or .net), then Google will determine the country where you can be displayed based on the content you publish in your site and the locations of your inbound links.
I used to work on Youtube and blog at the same time. But when Neil Patel removed keywords research option for Youtube from Ubersuggest. I was shocked. Currently, I am working on the education board result and using free tools because I am new and have not enough money to consume paid tools. But your article taught me about more free keywords research tools. I will try them all. Thanks.
×