A proper SEO audit guide should always include the XML Sitemap Check because doing so will guarantee that User Experience always lands on a positive note. For you to make sure that the search engine finds your XML sitemap, you need to add it to your Google Search Console account. Click the ‘Sitemaps’ section and see if your XML sitemap is already listed there. If not, immediately add it on your console.
[click_to_tweet tweet=”It’s not rocket science: the more lucrative the keyword, the tougher the competition. And unless you’re a big-name brand yourself, it’ll be nigh impossible to compete against those with more manpower, funds, and experience. – Ankit Singla, MasterBlogging.com” quote=”It’s not rocket science: the more lucrative the keyword, the tougher the competition. And unless you’re a big-name brand yourself, it’ll be nigh impossible to compete against those with more manpower, funds, and experience.”]
Great Top 10 keyword research tools list. Thank you for posting Robbie! I really appreciated the feedback from the experts. There are a definitely a few tools here worthy of taking note of. I have also been using DYNO Mapper (http://www.dynomapper.com) as a keyword research tool. DYNO Mapper is a visual sitemap generator that delivers keywords on all pages of any site. The user simply inputs any existing URL into the system and it will scan thousands of pages. 

Recently I had a dilemma with one of my projects, it is related to ecards and many people still using word “cards” instead of “ecards” but Google Keyword Planner and some other tools showed almost the same information for both keywords. At the same time I did not want to have many words “cards” and “ecards” on the landing pages. Semrush helped very much. I found correct data and made a nice PPC campaign.
I used to work on Youtube and blog at the same time. But when Neil Patel removed keywords research option for Youtube from Ubersuggest. I was shocked. Currently, I am working on the education board result and using free tools because I am new and have not enough money to consume paid tools. But your article taught me about more free keywords research tools. I will try them all. Thanks.
In Chapter 2, we learned about SERP features. That background is going to help us understand how searchers want to consume information for a particular keyword. The format in which Google chooses to display search results depends on intent, and every query has a unique one. Google describes these intents in their Quality Rater Guidelines as either “know” (find information), “do” (accomplish a goal), “website” (find a specific website), or “visit-in-person” (visit a local business).
How do you go about a Pagination? You have to simply place the attributes: rel=”prev” and rel=”next” in the head of each page in the series. Perform an audit by using an SEO Spider tool. While doing this, make sure that the attributes serve its purpose and that is to establish a relationship between the interconnected URLs that directs the user to the most relevant content that they need.
There is a myriad of search algorithm updates, erratic market trends, increase in competition, among other things, all the more reason for you to be always on the move. With the help of the different tools that you can easily access with just a google searc>h away, all of these can be done in a snap. If you are committed to these practices, SEO ranking would just be a light feather on your workload.
For the price of membership to Wealthy Affiliate you get access Jaaxy, hundreds of training videos, step by step training plans, A site builder tool and too many other features to mention here. The Wealthy Affiliate monthly membership fee is much less than the Jaaxy Pro fee ($49) and you get access to a ton of useful tools including Jaaxy. I have a review of WA that will walk you through all the bells and whistles including the version of Jaaxy that is included.
Jaaxy is an online keyword finder owned by Kyle Loudoun and Carson Lim that promises to help you find low-competition keywords that will help you improve your rank in the search engines. Other Jaaxy features include alphabet soup, which allows you to brainstorm for keywords; saved list, which allows you to save your list of keywords so that you can view them later; and search analysis, which lets you search what is already on search engines such as Yahoo, Google, and Bing. Jaaxy offers a free trial as you get started, and you can also choose between the pro version and the enterprise version if you like how it works.
I actually don't use any keyword tools aside from Google Trends, but only rarely do I even use that. I try to talk to many of our target audience members (entrepreneurs) as I can. I attend events, I have phone calls, I sit next to them while working. Generally speaking, I think it's a waste of time to START with keyword tools instead of actual customers. Yes, you can target people in broad swaths and get a high level sense for what's interesting and trending, but at least in the case of our business at NextView Ventures, it's way more powerful to talk to actual "customers" you serve.
Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.

So after seeing the keyword “blogging” is hard to rank for, what should you do? Well, this is where I use another free tool to even more quickly generate long tail variations. KWFinder does this as well, but not as quick. So I launch a tool called Ubersuggest . It is 100% free and no subscriptions required unlike keywordtool.io. So I input the keyword “blogging” into it and I search for a better long tail variation. I see one that catches my eye, “blogging away debt.”

1) Ahrefs to quickly see “the big picture” when it comes to any keyword I'm researching. I can instantly see the top holders in the SERPs. I then immediately take the top holders list and go check out their sites. I need to make sure I can beat them content-wise, otherwise I will search for another keyword to try and rank for, or perhaps go down the long-tail route. The Ahrefs tool and data quality get better and better every year. It's one of my favorite tools.
Long tail keywords are the low hanging fruit of keyword research. These are phrases with low competition, and generally low search volume as well. While any individual long tail keyword might not attract a ton of organic traffic, targeting them en masse can be an easy way to quickly pick up steam in your niche and poise yourself for tackling more competitive search terms.
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
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