I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
A proper SEO audit guide should always include the XML Sitemap Check because doing so will guarantee that User Experience always lands on a positive note. For you to make sure that the search engine finds your XML sitemap, you need to add it to your Google Search Console account. Click the ‘Sitemaps’ section and see if your XML sitemap is already listed there. If not, immediately add it on your console.
This is something I’ll admit that I’ve done in the past – just assumed that ‘these are the keywords consumers must be using’, but keyword research tools have shown a plethora of terms that I certainly wouldn’t have managed to come up with, and I agree that as the language of products evolve, we should do regular checks to ensure we’re keeping up with that evolution.
You likely have a few keywords in mind that you would like to rank for. These will be things like your products, services, or other topics your website addresses, and they are great seed keywords for your research, so start there! You can enter those keywords into a keyword research tool to discover average monthly search volume and similar keywords. We’ll get into search volume in greater depth in the next section, but during the discovery phase, it can help you determine which variations of your keywords are most popular amongst searchers.
We need a metric to compare our specific level of authority (and likelihood of ranking) to other websites. Google’s own metric is called PageRank, named after Google founder Larry Page. Way back in the day, you could look up the PageRank for any website. It was shown on a scale of one-to-ten right there in a Google toolbar that many of us added to our browsers.
Some words have the same meaning in different places, while others have very different meanings from one place to another. One example would be the world “biscuit.” In the United States, a biscuit is a soft fluffy “bread” dough baked to golden perfection. In the UK, a biscuit is more of a sweet treat which would generally be called a cookie in the US.
1) SEMrush - I believe that among all the 3rd party software, SEMrush has the largest keyword database. Their search volume data is pretty accurate and aligns with the Google keyword planner. Also, based on the type of content that needs to be produced (i.e. informational, transactional, etc.), one can utilize different filtering options available in it.
Jaaxy is an online keyword finder owned by Kyle Loudoun and Carson Lim that promises to help you find low-competition keywords that will help you improve your rank in the search engines. Other Jaaxy features include alphabet soup, which allows you to brainstorm for keywords; saved list, which allows you to save your list of keywords so that you can view them later; and search analysis, which lets you search what is already on search engines such as Yahoo, Google, and Bing. Jaaxy offers a free trial as you get started, and you can also choose between the pro version and the enterprise version if you like how it works.
After diagnosing your site through the different facets of the search engine (Google), it’s time for you to check your website as an entity. The tool we’ve always used to check on our site’s onsite status is Screaming Frog. We’ve always used it as the websites we handle grow larger as the months pass by. You set the parameters and it’s even capable of crawling/compiling outbound links to let you know if you have broken links. Here’s what the overview looks like:
Hey, friends! Today I’m going to share some ridiculously easy (and free!) keyword research tips to help your blog posts get more traffic. We’re going to keep this easy-to-read without getting into all that confusing keyword mumbo-jumbo. Plus, this method doesn’t take more than a search bar! Easy, right? If you’re new to keyword research, then you’re in the right spot!

Keyword research should be included in a larger marketing strategy to identify your target audience and predict customer behavior. Every marketing strategy should begin with knowing your audience. To identify which keywords will most effectively attract web traffic, you need to predict how your customers will utilize search. Forecasting how your customers will behave starts with knowing who your customers are. What are their demographics? What do they care about? What are they looking for that relates to your business? Once you know who you’re targeting, the web offers a treasure-trove of information you can use in your keyword research.
I will be creating a resources page with a massive set of links to the best tools. Please do subscribe to get the alert when I post it. I’ll also put up my live audit series shortly on my new Youtube Channel. That has a ton of stuff in it! There’s some neat look over the shoulder audits. A lot of the stuff has to be done manually and by just using a handful of tools. You don’t need too many weapons!
The Google Keyword Tool is SUPER helpful for building a foundation for your keyword research strategy. At the end of the day, these search numbers are coming straight from the horses mouth. You can filter down to a hyper-local level and see which keywords are getting the largest search volume. Plus, with it’s integration with PPC you can get a quick idea about commercial intent by looking at the bid and competition metrics. How much are people bidding on KWs, higher = more likely to generate a return. Usually its aligned with search intent. That said, the trending data is a little less reliable. I would still use Trends to analyze the popularity/ seasonality of KW search volume.

After diagnosing your site through the different facets of the search engine (Google), it’s time for you to check your website as an entity. The tool we’ve always used to check on our site’s onsite status is Screaming Frog. We’ve always used it as the websites we handle grow larger as the months pass by. You set the parameters and it’s even capable of crawling/compiling outbound links to let you know if you have broken links. Here’s what the overview looks like:
Nikolay Stoyanov is a well-known Bulgarian SEO expert with nearly 10 years of SEO experience. He's a proud graduate of Brian Dean's SEO That Works course. Nikolay is an ethical SEO evangelist and has a vast experience in keyword research, on-page optimization, SEO audits and white hat link building. He's also the owner of the biggest White Hat SEO group in Facebook (17 000+ members). You can also connect with Nik on Facebook or follow him on Twitter.
2. The second category are keyword tools based on the competition. One of the first things to determine is not only who the business competitors are, but who the SEO competitors are. Keyword research can be done by simply doing research on high-performing competitors. Some of my favorite domain-based keyword tools are SEMrush, SpyFu, and BrightEdge's Data Cube.
We need a metric to compare our specific level of authority (and likelihood of ranking) to other websites. Google’s own metric is called PageRank, named after Google founder Larry Page. Way back in the day, you could look up the PageRank for any website. It was shown on a scale of one-to-ten right there in a Google toolbar that many of us added to our browsers.
To find keywords which generate traffic and conversions, try to use modifiers that are appropriate for your niche. If you run a business that sells on a large scale, modifiers such as the words ‘wholesaler’ or ‘retailer’ can help you find your ideal client. People looking for quality use modifiers such as ‘best’ or ‘elegant,’ while those looking for the best price use ‘cheap’ or ‘discount’ to find your product.
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
A Keyword Research Suite of tools that can be used to discover keywords, competition, relevant data, site rankings for searched keywords along with storing saved searches or exporting them to a file and also giving information about available affiliate programs for products, brainstorm new topics. Providing the user with invaluable information to judge the market in which to promote.
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