Keyword research is the process of isolating words and phrases to rank on search engine result pages (SERPS). Your keyword research will guide you in developing a content strategy to increase web traffic to your digital products. Below are 10 keyword research tips to improve SEO rankings and organically drive mobile and web traffic to your business:
Are you a business owner, online marketer or content creator? If so, most likely you would like more people to visit your website, read your content and buy your products or services. The easiest way to achieve it is to find out what your potential customers or readers are searching for on Google and create content on your website around these topics.
QSR (Quoted Search Results) – This is your competition. This is the number of websites using the same exact keyword you searched for.  If you aim under 400, you have a good chance of getting ranked (300 is ideal). I try and keep mine below 150 so I have a much better chance of getting results much quicker  The opportunities are truly endless for keywords and having this information is extremely helpful
To find keywords which generate traffic and conversions, try to use modifiers that are appropriate for your niche. If you run a business that sells on a large scale, modifiers such as the words ‘wholesaler’ or ‘retailer’ can help you find your ideal client. People looking for quality use modifiers such as ‘best’ or ‘elegant,’ while those looking for the best price use ‘cheap’ or ‘discount’ to find your product.
Jaaxy is an online keyword finder owned by Kyle Loudoun and Carson Lim that promises to help you find low-competition keywords that will help you improve your rank in the search engines. Other Jaaxy features include alphabet soup, which allows you to brainstorm for keywords; saved list, which allows you to save your list of keywords so that you can view them later; and search analysis, which lets you search what is already on search engines such as Yahoo, Google, and Bing. Jaaxy offers a free trial as you get started, and you can also choose between the pro version and the enterprise version if you like how it works.
I’ve found google trends to be an interesting way to see if a keyword (and by extension a niche) is growing or shrinking, and whether it’s seasonal or not. I can’t think of any other tool out there that can reliably tell you this information, so that’s really useful. Also, if you’re building a site, especially an authority site, getting onto something that’s trending upwards is a fantastic idea.
Some generic words like flowers, for example, may be associated with a wide variety of ideas, images, concepts and instructions. The extent of this term matches very little (or no) market demand, but what happens if I forgot that tomorrow is my wife’s birthday? Urgent search appears for emergency needs. Instead of searching for ‘flowers’ or ‘flowers delivery’ I could look for ‘flowers delivery 24hs’ or ‘flowers delivery same day'.
External duplicate content is when you copy-paste content from other websites. Usually without placing a link to the original source or using canonical attribute. Google dislikes such content for one simple reason. It doesn’t add any value to end users and the Internet in general. If you have to choose between copying articles from other sources or not having any at all, I’d suggest you choose the latter. 

To use this feature, click on the second tab that you will find on the top right bar. Type in the keywords that you want to view the performance of, and also type in the name of your domain. Hit the search button and allow the software to find whatever you are looking for. Site rank will analyze the top page of Yahoo, Google, and Bing to find where your site could be. Jaaxy will also show you how your post or page is performing, so you will know if it is climbing or dropping in the search.
When a business has many citations with few inconsistencies, Google has more evidence that there is a relevant business is in that location. Therefore, Google is more likely to show that business listing when visitors in that area search for a related phrase. To quickly improve the number and consistency of your citations and improve your local SEO, consider using a service such as Yext, BrightLocal or Moz Local.
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
I use Ahrefs to find ideas for keywords to add into content, and content to create around keyword opportunities. I like how Ahrefs shows keyword difficulty, search volume, traffic potential (how much organic search traffic it’s possible to get when you rank #1 for a parent topic keyword) and lets you group keywords together to create lists. It’s really useful.
You can also block certain files or folders with passwords to the public or from certain bots. For example if you are still setting up a site and don't want it accessed - you can block it. This is very useful when building your Private Blog Network, because you can block tools like Ahrefs and Majestic from crawling your PBN site and hence hide any backlinks to your main money site from being discovered by your competitors (and therefore hide your PBN entirely). You can read up on Private Blog Networks and how to build them in my PBN guide.
By quality of the post we are basically talking about the overall authority and ability to engage. A post with low quality will eventually get lower engagement levels by users and that signal will be passed down to Google eventually - that will result in loss of overall quality score of the site. Churning out content that is put out for the sake of driving blog post numbers and not the users - is a failing strategy.
It's wonderful to deal with keywords that have 50,000 searches a month, or even 5,000 searches a month, but in reality, these popular search terms only make up a fraction of all searches performed on the web. In fact, keywords with very high search volumes may even indicate ambiguous intent, which, if you target these terms, it could put you at risk for drawing visitors to your site whose goals don't match the content your page provides.
We need a metric to compare our specific level of authority (and likelihood of ranking) to other websites. Google’s own metric is called PageRank, named after Google founder Larry Page. Way back in the day, you could look up the PageRank for any website. It was shown on a scale of one-to-ten right there in a Google toolbar that many of us added to our browsers.
To answer your final question, yes but not really. You can definitely use AdWord keyword planner tool to get solid organic search volume estimates. However, don’t just stop there. Leverage other tools to find longer tail variations you can map against various stages of the buyer journey. I like to use SEMrush, Keyword Tool.io and Google autosuggest.
I know there are other tools that have nice features as well and I have tried some of them, but I always come back to Jaaxy, why? because it is very accurate with the data it provides and is easy to use once you get into it. From SEO to finding available affiliate programs for products to checking my ranks in SERPS It has it all in one package. I love it.
KWFinder was developed and created by Peter Hrbacik. He is amazing at providing great support for the tool. They have live chat on their website, which I have used quite a few times during the day. Also, their email support is also awesome. Below are a couple email conversations I have had with Peter. In this first email I suggested that they make the category headers clickable. Peter responded within 24 hours and said they will probably change it. And a couple days later, the change was implemented.
I think people's aresenal of keyword research tools are mostly the same: 1) You need a tool to examine search volume, most likely Google Keyword Planner 2) A tool to help you generate more keyword ideas. Tools that work with the search engines' autosuggestions are very popular such as KeywordTool.io and Ubersuggest 3) Then people might add a tool broaden the depth of their data, maybe including something like Google Trends or Moz's Keyword Difficulty tool.
At this point, it could be that your site is on the bad side of Google, maybe as a result of an offense and the like. The very first thing you should know is that Googlebot works differently from site to site. For instance, a well-known company with a lot of content have a higher chance of being indexed in no time as opposed to personal bloggers who post occasionally.
You can find broken internal links from within the Search Console. You need to attend to each warning appropriately telling Google that you have fixed it. Having excessive 404s will hurt your site if they are really 404s, because anyone could escalate the 404s by pointing randomly to pages that don't exist from external places, which is why this is not that big of a deal - but should be looked at.

You can also indicate which pages don't need to be crawled or are not important. You call the Googlebot to crawl and index your site from inside the Google Search Console. However, do note that although Google "looks" at your sitemap - Google is more interested in doing a raw crawl of your site - jumping from one link to another to spider all the pages in its database. By doing that, it also forms a link map of your site into its own index - which tell it which pages on your site are the most important pages (they are the ones that have the most links - the most prominent links).
For example Amazon as compared to a smaller niche Ecommerce website. Amazon does not need a blog to promote its content, the product landing pages alone do the trick and it does not need to funnel down traffic because of its already existing authority and the fact that thousands and millions of affiliates are promoting and bloggers are already writing about the products that get listed - and also that the reviews on the product pages form some fantastic content.
3) KWFinder is one of the "newer" kids on the block, but it's probably just about the easiest way I have found to find new long-tail keywords quickly. A couple of things I like about this tool is that it allows me to create lists of keywords. So I can group up my different sites by lists and revisit them at a later date. I can export the data to CSV and start building out campaigns. It also keeps a nice scrolling list of the last 20+ keywords you have looked up. The SEO difficulty indicator comes in very handy as well! As far as ease of use goes, KWFinder wins hands down.
If a member of your target audience who is looking for your topic landed on these same search results, what would they do? Would they immediately try again and search for something else? In other words, are the high ranking pages relevant to you, your brand and your content? If not, you’re in the wrong neighborhood. Go back and consider different phrases.
The Google Keyword Tool is SUPER helpful for building a foundation for your keyword research strategy. At the end of the day, these search numbers are coming straight from the horses mouth. You can filter down to a hyper-local level and see which keywords are getting the largest search volume. Plus, with it’s integration with PPC you can get a quick idea about commercial intent by looking at the bid and competition metrics. How much are people bidding on KWs, higher = more likely to generate a return. Usually its aligned with search intent. That said, the trending data is a little less reliable. I would still use Trends to analyze the popularity/ seasonality of KW search volume.
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