Some words have the same meaning in different places, while others have very different meanings from one place to another. One example would be the world “biscuit.” In the United States, a biscuit is a soft fluffy “bread” dough baked to golden perfection. In the UK, a biscuit is more of a sweet treat which would generally be called a cookie in the US.
There are a ton of tools available to check backlinks. Moz, ahrefs, Majestic and plenty more. But most of these more well-known products have something in common--They're pricey. On top of that, most of them are enterprise level so the average blogger just starting out doesn't have the budget for it. So I set out to find an alternative. Enter Monitor Backlinks.

First, make sure that you have an XML sitemap for your website and have submitted it to Google Search Console. This will tell the search engine where all your webpages are so that they can be crawled. And it also establishes you as the original author of your site content, which can stop it being removed from search engine listings for duplicated content.
For high-volume searches, keyword selection tools are usually quite efficient. Conversely, when the volume is low, the results are often misleading or near zero. In 2004, Google engineer Amit Singhal announced that over 50% of searches on Google were unique. Also, a 2009 study showed a 22% increase in the length of the search strings of 8 words or more.
One important strategy for getting specific enough to rank is researching long-tail keyword phrases. For instance, instead of searching for travel agent, a user may prefer the specificity of “Disney travel agents for European cruises.” Seventy percent of Google search are long-tail queries. Long-tail presents the opportunity to optimize for your target audience. As you research keywords, look for long-tail keyword phrases you can prioritize.
If a member of your target audience who is looking for your topic landed on these same search results, what would they do? Would they immediately try again and search for something else? In other words, are the high ranking pages relevant to you, your brand and your content? If not, you’re in the wrong neighborhood. Go back and consider different phrases.
First of all Thank you !! for sharing our post on social media, that really helps get the word out to folks who may need to know about how awesome Jaaxy is. As far as the comparison, well they are both good tools, I will say that the Keyword tool inside WA portal in accurate and has very good useful information, I use it as well. It is however not a complete suite of tools like Jaaxy is, with the Rank Checker for 3 Major search engines, and the search analysis features and the “alphabet soup” search which is amazing as far as relevancy for any niche.. I have found Jaaxy to be extremely accurate in the data provided and as you can see, my ranks are showing as much and this website is still fairly young.  I have now sent 4 consecutive posts to page 1 or 2 within minutes after posting, simply by using the data Jaaxy provides and following what we have been taught on how to use the data.
What these Google suggestions are based on is real content that lives on the web. Google is trying to connect searchers with the content they might be looking for. As a marketer, this is helpful to you because it shows you what already exists out there in the niches where you operate, and if you don’t have content on those topics yet, maybe you should.
Now for the fun part. Let’s dive into the dashboard. In this example below I am going to use the keyword “blogging.” So for me, I want to know the search volume for anywhere because a lot of my sites target the entire internet, I don’t care what country they are in. And I choose English as the language. You can easily change the location. If you are working with local clients it might make sense to narrow it down to a city or state. Note: you can also import a CSV of keywords if you are coming from a different tool or have a large list.
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
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