2) SEMrush- This tool offers fantastic competitive research around domains to find what keywords could be driving traffic for your competitors. Looking at paid keywords ad spend can also help you know which keywords might have monetary value worth pursuing organically. If a competitor is willing to spend a high ad budget on terms and you think they do a good job running their ad campaign, then its a good indication it is worth organic ranking effort. 

Anjali, I think you should start with the Keyword Planner from Google. As a free option it is one of the best. SEMRush is great but you need to pay for it to be really effective. After GKP (Google Keyword Planner) I would also take a look at the other, more unknown suggestions Ankit talked about like KWFinder or Keyword Eye – they are quite good and will sometimes reveal keywords you wouldn’t find otherwise (for free).
In the meantime, you’ll want to do your research and find some of the most effective website audit tools to make the planning stage a whole lot easier for you. The good news is that the web is saturated with different site audit tools, most of which can help you figure out problem areas that affect your site’s performance. One of the best tools to check out is SE Ranking Website Audit — it can help identify website errors at a glance thus giving the professionals every information they need to work on your site keep it in tiptop shape.

In addition, you can dig into the paid side of search and find out what keywords your competitors are bidding on, and then leverage those keywords for your own organic benefit if you're not already doing so. Search Metrics does this as well, but I've found SEMrush to provide a greater range of keywords and they save more historical keyword data than Search Metrics.

We also have a very unique “Local Search” only keyword search that cross references the populations of all towns and cities in USA, Canada & UK. So you can put in a search like “plumber” then choose to see all the cities in “California” with a population of between 50k – 100k and it will spit out plumber suggestions attached to the locale. Pretty neat.


The highest number is the one that would give you the most potential return. If you have a big-time domain and can rank pretty easily on competitive keywords, start at the top. If you’re a newer, smaller site and can’t really play with the big guns yet, it might make more sense to start in the middle of the sorted keyword research list – these aren’t the “monster” keywords in your niche, but they’re also less competitive, and therefore easier to rank on.
With so many other factors that determine how well your video does, there’s no reason to add the expense to your plate if it’s not already there. So, leverage your free options! Use them to find keyword suggestions and sort them based on their volume and potential for your business. If you decide that you need more after that, move up to the big leagues.
I think people's aresenal of keyword research tools are mostly the same: 1) You need a tool to examine search volume, most likely Google Keyword Planner 2) A tool to help you generate more keyword ideas. Tools that work with the search engines' autosuggestions are very popular such as KeywordTool.io and Ubersuggest 3) Then people might add a tool broaden the depth of their data, maybe including something like Google Trends or Moz's Keyword Difficulty tool.
Don’t underestimate these less popular keywords. Long tail keywords with lower search volume often convert better, because searchers are more specific and intentional in their searches. For example, a person searching for "shoes" is probably just browsing. On the other hand, someone searching for "best price red womens size 7 running shoe" practically has their wallet out!
I will be creating a resources page with a massive set of links to the best tools. Please do subscribe to get the alert when I post it. I’ll also put up my live audit series shortly on my new Youtube Channel. That has a ton of stuff in it! There’s some neat look over the shoulder audits. A lot of the stuff has to be done manually and by just using a handful of tools. You don’t need too many weapons!
Performing a pagination audit can affect your SEO efforts in your site because it deals heavily with how organized your pages are. Meaning, that task of pagination audit is done with the end goal of organizing sequential pages and making sure that these are all contextually connected. Not only is this helpful for site visitors, but it also projects a message to search engines that your pages have continuity.
However, this does not mean you cannot topple them. It just takes more of an effort in terms of content as your page has to build the trust. That is why you will see the "Google dance" happening for fresh content from a site that is not yet trusted or is not very authoritative. Google gives your page a chance and measures user click-throughs when it pushes you to certain spots in the SERPs and then measures user engagement levels when the traffic hit your site through those positions in the SERPs.
So after seeing the keyword “blogging” is hard to rank for, what should you do? Well, this is where I use another free tool to even more quickly generate long tail variations. KWFinder does this as well, but not as quick. So I launch a tool called Ubersuggest . It is 100% free and no subscriptions required unlike keywordtool.io. So I input the keyword “blogging” into it and I search for a better long tail variation. I see one that catches my eye, “blogging away debt.”
I like to start with Google first, because Google looks at more of the words within our blog post and tends to keep content evergreen longer. This method is so simple and I learned it from Lena over at WhatMommyDoes.com. Simply go to Google and start typing in a couple words related to your blog post. It will give you suggestions of what people are searching for – hello, keywords!
A proper SEO audit guide should always include the XML Sitemap Check because doing so will guarantee that User Experience always lands on a positive note. For you to make sure that the search engine finds your XML sitemap, you need to add it to your Google Search Console account. Click the ‘Sitemaps’ section and see if your XML sitemap is already listed there. If not, immediately add it on your console.
To check your sitemap for errors, use Screamingfrog to configure it. Open the tool and select List mode. Insert the URL of your sitemap.xml to the tool by uploading it, then selecting the option for “Download sitemap”. Screamingfrog will then confirm the URLs that are found within the sitemap file. Start crawling and once done, export the data to CSV or sort it by Status Code. This will highlight errors or other potential problems that you should head on out and fix immediately.
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