The higher the search volume for a given keyword or keyword phrase, the more work is typically required to achieve higher rankings. This is often referred to as keyword difficulty and occasionally incorporates SERP features; for example, if many SERP features (like featured snippets, knowledge graph, carousels, etc) are clogging up a keyword’s result page, difficulty will increase. Big brands often take up the top 10 results for high-volume keywords, so if you’re just starting out on the web and going after the same keywords, the uphill battle for ranking can take years of effort.
What is KWFinder? Well, KWFinder is really an alternative to Google’s keyword planner, which just sucks. Anyone that uses AdWords or any of Google’s tools on a daily basis know that they are just very clunky and the UI is lacking. But of course, it is free so sometimes you can’t be too picky. But in my opinion, if a tool provides real value and speeds up my work, then it is worth every penny.

I recently paid to use the moz keyword tool, and its been really insightful. (but expensive!) it helps find synonyms and other wording that i never would have thought to include in my post. also, i’ve realized the importance of allowing comments on blogs, as people discussing the topic seem to add those terms naturally to the post. thx for the post!
KWFinder was developed and created by Peter Hrbacik. He is amazing at providing great support for the tool. They have live chat on their website, which I have used quite a few times during the day. Also, their email support is also awesome. Below are a couple email conversations I have had with Peter. In this first email I suggested that they make the category headers clickable. Peter responded within 24 hours and said they will probably change it. And a couple days later, the change was implemented.
3. Ninja Outreach: Full disclosure this is my own tool, and it is actually an outreach tool, so you may be wondering how it plays into Keyword Research. The fact is there are quite a few data points that NinjaOutreach gets for me that I find useful in keyword research, such as the articles that are ranking for the keyword in Google, their domain authority, their page authority, the number of backlinks they have, and other social and contact data. It's pretty valuable stuff, especially if there is going to be an outreach campaign tied into the keyword research. I wrote a great article with Jake from LTP showing the combination of the two tools.
How do you go about a Pagination? You have to simply place the attributes: rel=”prev” and rel=”next” in the head of each page in the series. Perform an audit by using an SEO Spider tool. While doing this, make sure that the attributes serve its purpose and that is to establish a relationship between the interconnected URLs that directs the user to the most relevant content that they need.
3) Google: This is pretty straight forward but it’s the main reason I like it. I search for my main seed keyword in Google, and use the keywords that Google itself highlights in bold on the search results, plus the “Searches related to” section at the bottom to get keyword variations or LSI. That’s basically what Google is telling you that topic is about. No need for a thousands other tools. I use these to optimize the on page of my target pages as well.
The total number of backlinks and their quality pointing to your complete website result in the overall authority of your domain. The external links that all point to a specific page will help this page to rank in the search engine results (SERPs). The relevance and quality of an external link are very important factors when you like to measure the impact / value of an link. To find out more about quality links have a look at this article on: the Official Google Webmaster Central Blog – https://webmasters.googleblog.com/2010/06/quality-links-to-your-site.html
Keyword research is an important part of SEO, because it will help you to understand the interests of your customers. Based on this knowledge, you’re able to identify  keyword opportunities in your industry that will help you to write successful online content. By doing your keyword research the right way, your able to have a positive impact on your content performance. Translating into higher rankings, better content engagement and a higher conversion rate. 
We need a metric to compare our specific level of authority (and likelihood of ranking) to other websites. Google’s own metric is called PageRank, named after Google founder Larry Page. Way back in the day, you could look up the PageRank for any website. It was shown on a scale of one-to-ten right there in a Google toolbar that many of us added to our browsers.
Openlinkprofile provides you with different options while checking backlinks for your blog. This free backlink checker tool is brought to you by SEOProfiler.  For example, if you need a detailed report or optimization, or if you want to check backlinks for a single page or an entire website, Link Diagnosis allows you to do all of this.  It also offers various types of outputs and other features.
The higher the search volume for a given keyword or keyword phrase, the more work is typically required to achieve higher rankings. This is often referred to as keyword difficulty and occasionally incorporates SERP features; for example, if many SERP features (like featured snippets, knowledge graph, carousels, etc) are clogging up a keyword’s result page, difficulty will increase. Big brands often take up the top 10 results for high-volume keywords, so if you’re just starting out on the web and going after the same keywords, the uphill battle for ranking can take years of effort.
I’ve found google trends to be an interesting way to see if a keyword (and by extension a niche) is growing or shrinking, and whether it’s seasonal or not. I can’t think of any other tool out there that can reliably tell you this information, so that’s really useful. Also, if you’re building a site, especially an authority site, getting onto something that’s trending upwards is a fantastic idea.
Competitor analysis should be an important part of your keyword research. It’s important to know how your competitors are ranking. Competitor analysis can reveal holes in your own content. Also, you should steal ideas from your competitors. However, never use the same content. Duplicate content will also be penalized by Google and is frowned upon generally. Emulate success, but be cognizant of keyword difficulty, which measures your chances of ranking with a keyword phrase due to significant competition. Also, be aware that Google almost always rewards brand keywords to the owner. You’re unlikely to trick Google into ranking you with your competitors’ brand names.
3) KWFinder is one of the "newer" kids on the block, but it's probably just about the easiest way I have found to find new long-tail keywords quickly. A couple of things I like about this tool is that it allows me to create lists of keywords. So I can group up my different sites by lists and revisit them at a later date. I can export the data to CSV and start building out campaigns. It also keeps a nice scrolling list of the last 20+ keywords you have looked up. The SEO difficulty indicator comes in very handy as well! As far as ease of use goes, KWFinder wins hands down.
In Chapter 2, we learned about SERP features. That background is going to help us understand how searchers want to consume information for a particular keyword. The format in which Google chooses to display search results depends on intent, and every query has a unique one. Google describes these intents in their Quality Rater Guidelines as either “know” (find information), “do” (accomplish a goal), “website” (find a specific website), or “visit-in-person” (visit a local business).

I used to work on Youtube and blog at the same time. But when Neil Patel removed keywords research option for Youtube from Ubersuggest. I was shocked. Currently, I am working on the education board result and using free tools because I am new and have not enough money to consume paid tools. But your article taught me about more free keywords research tools. I will try them all. Thanks.
I’ve found google trends to be an interesting way to see if a keyword (and by extension a niche) is growing or shrinking, and whether it’s seasonal or not. I can’t think of any other tool out there that can reliably tell you this information, so that’s really useful. Also, if you’re building a site, especially an authority site, getting onto something that’s trending upwards is a fantastic idea.
To find keywords which generate traffic and conversions, try to use modifiers that are appropriate for your niche. If you run a business that sells on a large scale, modifiers such as the words ‘wholesaler’ or ‘retailer’ can help you find your ideal client. People looking for quality use modifiers such as ‘best’ or ‘elegant,’ while those looking for the best price use ‘cheap’ or ‘discount’ to find your product.
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