What is KWFinder? Well, KWFinder is really an alternative to Google’s keyword planner, which just sucks. Anyone that uses AdWords or any of Google’s tools on a daily basis know that they are just very clunky and the UI is lacking. But of course, it is free so sometimes you can’t be too picky. But in my opinion, if a tool provides real value and speeds up my work, then it is worth every penny.
Yes Jaaxy has it all really. Not just Keywords and an Awesome new Rank Checker but also competition information and other methods for searching. Much More under the hood than what is a first glance..Highly recommend getting in with Pro Or Enterprise BEFORE SEPTEMBER so you can keep the current price structure. Those in after September will be subject to new prices..I am Glad you like jaaxy, keep using it and you will see how accurate the data really is.
Some words have the same meaning in different places, while others have very different meanings from one place to another. One example would be the world “biscuit.” In the United States, a biscuit is a soft fluffy “bread” dough baked to golden perfection. In the UK, a biscuit is more of a sweet treat which would generally be called a cookie in the US.
NAP acronym sands for Name Address Phone. You need to ensure that your are consistent in the way you list your Name, Address an Phone data on your site and on other citation and directory sites. Discrepancies in the way you are listed across various properties including your own site and on Google+Local, Google Maps, Yelp, and all the other directory and citation sites - can result in the Google Local engine to not give you ranking points for the local seo citations.
3. Ninja Outreach: Full disclosure this is my own tool, and it is actually an outreach tool, so you may be wondering how it plays into Keyword Research. The fact is there are quite a few data points that NinjaOutreach gets for me that I find useful in keyword research, such as the articles that are ranking for the keyword in Google, their domain authority, their page authority, the number of backlinks they have, and other social and contact data. It's pretty valuable stuff, especially if there is going to be an outreach campaign tied into the keyword research. I wrote a great article with Jake from LTP showing the combination of the two tools.

Thanks so much for offering this helpful tool. It is very useful. In case you want feedback, I think it would be great if you could please also consider including another column to display the linked page (i.e., the actual page that the backlink goes to on the domain). When selecting “All pages on this domain” it is difficult to know which page each backlink is going to on the domain. Thanks for your consideration.
It's wonderful to deal with keywords that have 50,000 searches a month, or even 5,000 searches a month, but in reality, these popular search terms only make up a fraction of all searches performed on the web. In fact, keywords with very high search volumes may even indicate ambiguous intent, which, if you target these terms, it could put you at risk for drawing visitors to your site whose goals don't match the content your page provides.
KWFinder is one of those tools I use multiple times throughout every single day. Whenever I come up with an idea for a post or am writing a post I always make sure to check on the keyword volume and difficulty. It makes the process for keyword research way easier than other tools! I am always surprised by how fast the tool returns the results. Especially if you compare it to alternatives like Long Tail Pro, which I stopped using a long time ago. Whether you are blogging, creating landing pages, or writing any kind of content for the web, I highly urge you to try KWFinder. It is become a crucial part of my toolset and I would not be as good of a marketer without it.
As for duplicate content, Google gets confused when you create and publish articles with similar content, and this eventually leads to indexation issues. Keyword cannibalization happens when the owner focuses his effort on ranking for a particular keyword from several different pages. When this happens, Google won’t acknowledge multiple pages; they’ll only focus on the best one thus making the other ones useless and inaccessible to search engines.
I’ve found google trends to be an interesting way to see if a keyword (and by extension a niche) is growing or shrinking, and whether it’s seasonal or not. I can’t think of any other tool out there that can reliably tell you this information, so that’s really useful. Also, if you’re building a site, especially an authority site, getting onto something that’s trending upwards is a fantastic idea.
To answer your final question, yes but not really. You can definitely use AdWord keyword planner tool to get solid organic search volume estimates. However, don’t just stop there. Leverage other tools to find longer tail variations you can map against various stages of the buyer journey. I like to use SEMrush, Keyword Tool.io and Google autosuggest.
Its important that you setup your social channels and interlink them and then engage with your users on social with the right content and drive traffic to your site through these channels. Racking up fake signals and fake followers who do not engage or visit your site through the channels, is easily detected by Google as false and it does not help your rankings.
If the pages you’ve created don’t rank for the keywords you’ve selected, you should re-evaluate your content strategy and adjust. If your page isn’t generating organic traffic, focus on less competitive keywords. Unfortunately in reality this is pretty common. The good thing is, you’ve collected a lot of actual keyword data at this stage. Adjust your keyword strategy and use this data in your advantage.      
XML sitemaps are especially useful because it lists your site’s most important pages, allowing the search engine to crawl them all and increase understanding on your website’s structure. Webmasters use the XML Sitemap to highlight the pages on their sites that are available for crawling. This XML file lists URLs together with additional meta-data about each of these links.
Long tail keywords are the low hanging fruit of keyword research. These are phrases with low competition, and generally low search volume as well. While any individual long tail keyword might not attract a ton of organic traffic, targeting them en masse can be an easy way to quickly pick up steam in your niche and poise yourself for tackling more competitive search terms.
Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.
Some generic words like flowers, for example, may be associated with a wide variety of ideas, images, concepts and instructions. The extent of this term matches very little (or no) market demand, but what happens if I forgot that tomorrow is my wife’s birthday? Urgent search appears for emergency needs. Instead of searching for ‘flowers’ or ‘flowers delivery’ I could look for ‘flowers delivery 24hs’ or ‘flowers delivery same day'.
Note - at this point Google already has baseline metrics from other search results. So, if your site beats them by a factor of say 3x then Google thinks - hey.. this page looks to be way better - so why not stick its rankings in the long term and why not even bounce it up higher and see what happens and measure again how users engage with the site?
I like to start with Google first, because Google looks at more of the words within our blog post and tends to keep content evergreen longer. This method is so simple and I learned it from Lena over at WhatMommyDoes.com. Simply go to Google and start typing in a couple words related to your blog post. It will give you suggestions of what people are searching for – hello, keywords!
In Chapter 2, we learned about SERP features. That background is going to help us understand how searchers want to consume information for a particular keyword. The format in which Google chooses to display search results depends on intent, and every query has a unique one. Google describes these intents in their Quality Rater Guidelines as either “know” (find information), “do” (accomplish a goal), “website” (find a specific website), or “visit-in-person” (visit a local business).
Some generic words like flowers, for example, may be associated with a wide variety of ideas, images, concepts and instructions. The extent of this term matches very little (or no) market demand, but what happens if I forgot that tomorrow is my wife’s birthday? Urgent search appears for emergency needs. Instead of searching for ‘flowers’ or ‘flowers delivery’ I could look for ‘flowers delivery 24hs’ or ‘flowers delivery same day'.
KWFinder was developed and created by Peter Hrbacik. He is amazing at providing great support for the tool. They have live chat on their website, which I have used quite a few times during the day. Also, their email support is also awesome. Below are a couple email conversations I have had with Peter. In this first email I suggested that they make the category headers clickable. Peter responded within 24 hours and said they will probably change it. And a couple days later, the change was implemented.

However, this does not mean you cannot topple them. It just takes more of an effort in terms of content as your page has to build the trust. That is why you will see the "Google dance" happening for fresh content from a site that is not yet trusted or is not very authoritative. Google gives your page a chance and measures user click-throughs when it pushes you to certain spots in the SERPs and then measures user engagement levels when the traffic hit your site through those positions in the SERPs.
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