So At the End Of This Post I Only Want to Say My Honest Words About Monitor Backlinks.If you are Serious About Blogging and A Seo Firm or Agency or digital Marketer. Then This Tool Will definitely For you Because Backlinks Are The Bone of every Website if you Want to Stay Away your Website from negative seo affect and Want to Find New Link Building Opportunities.

Negative SEO is basically when someone sends a ton of spammy, low quality backlinks to your site. The goal is to get Google to think your site is low quality because of all the crappy sites linking to you, and eventually devalue your site. There are actual companies that get paid to do negative SEO on behalf of their clients. It sucks, but it's reality.
3. Ninja Outreach: Full disclosure this is my own tool, and it is actually an outreach tool, so you may be wondering how it plays into Keyword Research. The fact is there are quite a few data points that NinjaOutreach gets for me that I find useful in keyword research, such as the articles that are ranking for the keyword in Google, their domain authority, their page authority, the number of backlinks they have, and other social and contact data. It's pretty valuable stuff, especially if there is going to be an outreach campaign tied into the keyword research. I wrote a great article with Jake from LTP showing the combination of the two tools.

This is something I’ll admit that I’ve done in the past – just assumed that ‘these are the keywords consumers must be using’, but keyword research tools have shown a plethora of terms that I certainly wouldn’t have managed to come up with, and I agree that as the language of products evolve, we should do regular checks to ensure we’re keeping up with that evolution.
I will use the tool to pull in a lot of keywords related to a theme and group them into relevant topics. These topics will either become their own content page or will be combined with other topics to create a page. KeywordTool.io is similar to other tools out there such as Uber Suggest, which I've used for a long time, but it tends to produce more keywords and it provides search volume for the keywords.
Search Engine Optimization is just a term that explains how we make our content (like blog posts) easy for search engines to find. We want to put specific words and phrases (keywords!) in our content that match up with the phrases people type into search bars. We also want to put those keywords into places where search engines like to read it. That’s it! Got it? Good job!
1) Ahrefs to quickly see “the big picture” when it comes to any keyword I'm researching. I can instantly see the top holders in the SERPs. I then immediately take the top holders list and go check out their sites. I need to make sure I can beat them content-wise, otherwise I will search for another keyword to try and rank for, or perhaps go down the long-tail route. The Ahrefs tool and data quality get better and better every year. It's one of my favorite tools.
Long tail keywords are the low hanging fruit of keyword research. These are phrases with low competition, and generally low search volume as well. While any individual long tail keyword might not attract a ton of organic traffic, targeting them en masse can be an easy way to quickly pick up steam in your niche and poise yourself for tackling more competitive search terms.
It’s important to note that entire websites don’t rank for keywords — pages do. With big brands, we often see the homepage ranking for many keywords, but for most websites this isn’t usually the case. Many websites receive more organic traffic to pages other than the homepage, which is why it’s so important to diversify your website’s pages by optimizing each for uniquely valuable keywords.

Once you’re done getting the trust, you’ll want to ensure that your content resonates with your audience and other bloggers. As we know, every of our content on the web is meant for the end user. That said, a good website is bound to see more traffic, better links, higher retention rate, more shares and smaller bounce rates. The bottom line; off-page analysis gives you a better picture of the impression your site leaves on users.
I like to start with Google first, because Google looks at more of the words within our blog post and tends to keep content evergreen longer. This method is so simple and I learned it from Lena over at WhatMommyDoes.com. Simply go to Google and start typing in a couple words related to your blog post. It will give you suggestions of what people are searching for – hello, keywords!
For businesses where the value of a potential transaction is high, such as a B2B service company, it may be useful to target very specific phrases with very few searches. Even if very few people search for a phrase each month, those potential visitors may be very targeted and be thrilled to have found your page. Long, very specific search phrases, such as entire questions, are called“long tail” keyphrases.
[click_to_tweet tweet=”It’s not rocket science: the more lucrative the keyword, the tougher the competition. And unless you’re a big-name brand yourself, it’ll be nigh impossible to compete against those with more manpower, funds, and experience. – Ankit Singla, MasterBlogging.com” quote=”It’s not rocket science: the more lucrative the keyword, the tougher the competition. And unless you’re a big-name brand yourself, it’ll be nigh impossible to compete against those with more manpower, funds, and experience.”]

What this does is give you an idea of how realistic it is for you to target keywords with high commercial value. You want to go after keywords with some volume, because they’ll have a better return in terms of traffic. But you don’t necessarily want to go after the most competitive keywords, because you’re less likely to be able to rank for them. You’re looking for a sweet spot.


Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.
3. Ninja Outreach: Full disclosure this is my own tool, and it is actually an outreach tool, so you may be wondering how it plays into Keyword Research. The fact is there are quite a few data points that NinjaOutreach gets for me that I find useful in keyword research, such as the articles that are ranking for the keyword in Google, their domain authority, their page authority, the number of backlinks they have, and other social and contact data. It's pretty valuable stuff, especially if there is going to be an outreach campaign tied into the keyword research. I wrote a great article with Jake from LTP showing the combination of the two tools.
3) Google: This is pretty straight forward but it’s the main reason I like it. I search for my main seed keyword in Google, and use the keywords that Google itself highlights in bold on the search results, plus the “Searches related to” section at the bottom to get keyword variations or LSI. That’s basically what Google is telling you that topic is about. No need for a thousands other tools. I use these to optimize the on page of my target pages as well.
Jaaxy without a doubt provides the value needed to justify the 3 price ranges. I have switched to only Jaaxy as I have found the data provided is amazingly accurate and all the features available really make SEO and Keyword research easy. Jaaxy is fantastic for Niche research and once inside there is training available to assist with that and while you find a great niche you can also find out if the domain name is available and click to purchase easily.  Infact I have a post about using Jaaxy to find a niche market https://webincome4me.com/how-t…
2) SEMrush- This tool offers fantastic competitive research around domains to find what keywords could be driving traffic for your competitors. Looking at paid keywords ad spend can also help you know which keywords might have monetary value worth pursuing organically. If a competitor is willing to spend a high ad budget on terms and you think they do a good job running their ad campaign, then its a good indication it is worth organic ranking effort.
I think people's aresenal of keyword research tools are mostly the same: 1) You need a tool to examine search volume, most likely Google Keyword Planner 2) A tool to help you generate more keyword ideas. Tools that work with the search engines' autosuggestions are very popular such as KeywordTool.io and Ubersuggest 3) Then people might add a tool broaden the depth of their data, maybe including something like Google Trends or Moz's Keyword Difficulty tool.  

Keyword research can also lead to great ideas for your business, services and overall marketing strategy. Keywords can be a window into understanding what your customers need. In this regard, your content strategy is about more than gaming the search engines. Keyword research is about connecting with your audience. If you ground your research in knowing your customers, the results can aid you in providing better products and services and increasing your brand loyalty.
Keyword research is a constant process. Trends change. Seasons change. Popular terms and catch-phrases change. SEO and marketing agencies are a great resource for ensuring that keyword research is done on a regular basis. You should refresh your research at least quarterly, ideally monthly, to stay ahead of your competitors. Partnering with a reputable SEO agency is a great way to ensure you’re always ahead of your competition.

Ext: The number external do-follow links that are on the page linking to you. Having a link on a page with only 3 do-follow external links can be a stronger signal than a link on a page with 100 external do-follow links. You'll notice the numbers are color-coded. Green means it's a good number of external links, black means neutral and red means there are too many other links on the page.
There is a myriad of search algorithm updates, erratic market trends, increase in competition, among other things, all the more reason for you to be always on the move. With the help of the different tools that you can easily access with just a google searc>h away, all of these can be done in a snap. If you are committed to these practices, SEO ranking would just be a light feather on your workload.
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
The WA Keyword tool works well also and I am glad you like it. I use it as well. The reason I prefer Jaaxy is because it is an entire suite of tools in one package for an affordable price. Good choice to wait until you can budget for it. The free version gives a good taste of what is available but the paid versions both Pro and Enterprise are truly game changers. Once you make the leap you wont go back.
Every online search starts with a keyword. This can be, by simply typing in your keyword into the Google search box or by using voice activated search. Based on the user input, search engines will return the most relevant results to answer the query. Optimizing your content and ranking for the right keywords, determines the success of your website and your online business.
The highest number is the one that would give you the most potential return. If you have a big-time domain and can rank pretty easily on competitive keywords, start at the top. If you’re a newer, smaller site and can’t really play with the big guns yet, it might make more sense to start in the middle of the sorted keyword research list – these aren’t the “monster” keywords in your niche, but they’re also less competitive, and therefore easier to rank on.
To check your sitemap for errors, use Screamingfrog to configure it. Open the tool and select List mode. Insert the URL of your sitemap.xml to the tool by uploading it, then selecting the option for “Download sitemap”. Screamingfrog will then confirm the URLs that are found within the sitemap file. Start crawling and once done, export the data to CSV or sort it by Status Code. This will highlight errors or other potential problems that you should head on out and fix immediately.
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