If the pages you’ve created don’t rank for the keywords you’ve selected, you should re-evaluate your content strategy and adjust. If your page isn’t generating organic traffic, focus on less competitive keywords. Unfortunately in reality this is pretty common. The good thing is, you’ve collected a lot of actual keyword data at this stage. Adjust your keyword strategy and use this data in your advantage.      
There are a ton of tools available to check backlinks. Moz, ahrefs, Majestic and plenty more. But most of these more well-known products have something in common--They're pricey. On top of that, most of them are enterprise level so the average blogger just starting out doesn't have the budget for it. So I set out to find an alternative. Enter Monitor Backlinks.
They also seem to be getting this wrong often enough that I've got less confidence that the keywords that make up these groups really belong there. I recently tried to check the volume for the keyword [active monitoring] (the practice of checking on a network by injecting test traffic and seeing how it's handled, as opposed to passive monitoring) and the Keyword Planner gave me the volume for [activity monitor] (aka Fitbit).
For the price of membership to Wealthy Affiliate you get access Jaaxy, hundreds of training videos, step by step training plans, A site builder tool and too many other features to mention here. The Wealthy Affiliate monthly membership fee is much less than the Jaaxy Pro fee ($49) and you get access to a ton of useful tools including Jaaxy. I have a review of WA that will walk you through all the bells and whistles including the version of Jaaxy that is included.
The Google Keyword Tool is SUPER helpful for building a foundation for your keyword research strategy. At the end of the day, these search numbers are coming straight from the horses mouth. You can filter down to a hyper-local level and see which keywords are getting the largest search volume. Plus, with it’s integration with PPC you can get a quick idea about commercial intent by looking at the bid and competition metrics. How much are people bidding on KWs, higher = more likely to generate a return. Usually its aligned with search intent. That said, the trending data is a little less reliable. I would still use Trends to analyze the popularity/ seasonality of KW search volume.
First of all Thank you !! for sharing our post on social media, that really helps get the word out to folks who may need to know about how awesome Jaaxy is. As far as the comparison, well they are both good tools, I will say that the Keyword tool inside WA portal in accurate and has very good useful information, I use it as well. It is however not a complete suite of tools like Jaaxy is, with the Rank Checker for 3 Major search engines, and the search analysis features and the “alphabet soup” search which is amazing as far as relevancy for any niche.. I have found Jaaxy to be extremely accurate in the data provided and as you can see, my ranks are showing as much and this website is still fairly young.  I have now sent 4 consecutive posts to page 1 or 2 within minutes after posting, simply by using the data Jaaxy provides and following what we have been taught on how to use the data.
Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.
For example Amazon as compared to a smaller niche Ecommerce website. Amazon does not need a blog to promote its content, the product landing pages alone do the trick and it does not need to funnel down traffic because of its already existing authority and the fact that thousands and millions of affiliates are promoting and bloggers are already writing about the products that get listed - and also that the reviews on the product pages form some fantastic content.
I know there are other tools that have nice features as well and I have tried some of them, but I always come back to Jaaxy, why? because it is very accurate with the data it provides and is easy to use once you get into it. From SEO to finding available affiliate programs for products to checking my ranks in SERPS It has it all in one package. I love it.
You can improve your site speed by a ton of methods, but the overall goal should be to test your site from different geo-locations using a tool like pingdom and then attend to issues. You could go for a CDN provider like Cloudflare or install caching plugins that speed up your site by reducing database queries and therefore the server load. Choosing the right hosting company for you is a critical decision and is based on many factors including your CMS, expected site traffic, and what your goals are for the site amongst others.
Todd, as a Wealthy Affiliate member, I have known about Jaaxy for a while, but never fancied spending the membership money whilst I had access to the keyword search tool offered by Wealthy Affiliate. However, I have now started piloting Jaaxy on the first 30 free searches, and boy if you are right! It is truly a powerful tool, which not only enables a genuine keyword search which reflects Serp ranking on the major SEO (and I have tested this myself by ‘playing about’ with keywords on these platforms), but it also offers website ranking, which for the same price you never find on alternative keyword search tools available on the market. To me, this in itself is a winning combination – definitely worth the upgrade to Pro membership!

For high-volume searches, keyword selection tools are usually quite efficient. Conversely, when the volume is low, the results are often misleading or near zero. In 2004, Google engineer Amit Singhal announced that over 50% of searches on Google were unique. Also, a 2009 study showed a 22% increase in the length of the search strings of 8 words or more.
Given you have a good idea of where to start and are fairly confident you are speaking the same language as your client, jump start research by generating related keyphrases and long tail variants with the ever so easy to use Google Autocomplete. This tool makes predictions based on what you are typing that are a reflection of Google search activity.

I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.


You can more strategically target a specific location by narrowing down your keyword research to specific towns, counties, or states in the Google Keyword Planner, or evaluate "interest by subregion" in Google Trends. Geo-specific research can help make your content more relevant to your target audience. For example, you might find out that in Texas, the preferred term for a large truck is “big rig,” while in New York, “tractor trailer” is the preferred terminology.
For high-volume searches, keyword selection tools are usually quite efficient. Conversely, when the volume is low, the results are often misleading or near zero. In 2004, Google engineer Amit Singhal announced that over 50% of searches on Google were unique. Also, a 2009 study showed a 22% increase in the length of the search strings of 8 words or more.
1) Google Keyword Planner: This tools is fantastic because it can help me to identify long tail keywords for my niche. It is official Google’s tool and it has the recent trends and keyword variations. For example you may think that this keyword is great “buy ipad air in liverpool” but Google may suggest “iPad air sale Liverpool”. Yes, not often it is accurate but when I’m using it alongside the other tools – I can get clear idea.
Jaaxy analyzes two metric variants to determine the SEO quality of your chosen keyword. The first one is traffic, while the second one is competition. It will then give you a score from 1 – 100. When the number is high, it means that other sites you are competing with have poorly optimized their websites, and you’ll get an acceptable number of visitors. Anything over 80 is really good.
1) Google Keyword Planner: This tools is fantastic because it can help me to identify long tail keywords for my niche. It is official Google’s tool and it has the recent trends and keyword variations. For example you may think that this keyword is great “buy ipad air in liverpool” but Google may suggest “iPad air sale Liverpool”. Yes, not often it is accurate but when I’m using it alongside the other tools – I can get clear idea.
A Keyword Research Suite of tools that can be used to discover keywords, competition, relevant data, site rankings for searched keywords along with storing saved searches or exporting them to a file and also giving information about available affiliate programs for products, brainstorm new topics. Providing the user with invaluable information to judge the market in which to promote.
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