We do a weekly checkup of our traffic count and once we saw the sudden drop, we knew something was wrong. The problem was, we didn’t do anything. I just published a new post and it suddenly became that way. I won’t go into how we investigated and fixed the cause of the drop, but this just goes to show how important it is to do a regular check of your traffic in Google Analytics. If we didn’t do the regular checks, then our traffic count might have just stayed that way until it becomes a crisis.
Of all the tools listed in this article, Moz Link explorer is an old one & quite popular.  If you want to compare backlinks between two or more domains, Open Site Explorer is worth trying. This tool works best when you have a paid account of SEOMOZ though a free version of this tool is good enough to get you started checking the backlinks of your site and the sites of your competitors. 

QSR (Quoted Search Results) – This is your competition. This is the number of websites using the same exact keyword you searched for.  If you aim under 400, you have a good chance of getting ranked (300 is ideal). I try and keep mine below 150 so I have a much better chance of getting results much quicker  The opportunities are truly endless for keywords and having this information is extremely helpful


Some of the keyword research tips we’ll cover might not look like they’ll do much for your organic SEO. But just because your audience isn’t Googling the topic doesn’t mean they won’t find it useful. Organic search metrics aren’t everything. Traffic is traffic. So some of these techniques are aimed at helping you research for content that will invite shares or be perfect for running ads to.

Keyword research should be included in a larger marketing strategy to identify your target audience and predict customer behavior. Every marketing strategy should begin with knowing your audience. To identify which keywords will most effectively attract web traffic, you need to predict how your customers will utilize search. Forecasting how your customers will behave starts with knowing who your customers are. What are their demographics? What do they care about? What are they looking for that relates to your business? Once you know who you’re targeting, the web offers a treasure-trove of information you can use in your keyword research.


An SEO audit that just includes some marketer telling you what they think is wrong might be helpful, but it’s not a true audit. You should require professional tools involving research and algorithms to be used in addition to professional opinions. Why? Because those tools were created for a reason. Whether your SEO audit pulls from sites like SEMrush or Screaming Frog SEO Spider, they should have data backing them up.
Hey, friends! Today I’m going to share some ridiculously easy (and free!) keyword research tips to help your blog posts get more traffic. We’re going to keep this easy-to-read without getting into all that confusing keyword mumbo-jumbo. Plus, this method doesn’t take more than a search bar! Easy, right? If you’re new to keyword research, then you’re in the right spot! 

ccTLD plays a role in stating which specific search market/location your site wants to rank in. Some examples of ccTLD would be websites ending in .ph, .au, etc. instead of the more neutral .com. If your website is example.ph, then you can expect that you’ll rank for Google.com.ph and you’ll have a hard time ranking for international search engines like Google.com.au. If you have TLDs that are neutral (.com, .org, or .net), then Google will determine the country where you can be displayed based on the content you publish in your site and the locations of your inbound links.
What’s the point of creating a website if Google and users can’t access its content? It’s incredibly important to check everything from your robots meta tags to robots.txt file to XML sitemaps and more. It’s highly recommended to check the robots.txt and robots meta tags since they usually restrict access to certain areas of your site. Just be sure to check them manually and ensure that everything is in good shape.
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
×