At this point, it could be that your site is on the bad side of Google, maybe as a result of an offense and the like. The very first thing you should know is that Googlebot works differently from site to site. For instance, a well-known company with a lot of content have a higher chance of being indexed in no time as opposed to personal bloggers who post occasionally.


There are a ton of tools available to check backlinks. Moz, ahrefs, Majestic and plenty more. But most of these more well-known products have something in common--They're pricey. On top of that, most of them are enterprise level so the average blogger just starting out doesn't have the budget for it. So I set out to find an alternative. Enter Monitor Backlinks.
To find keywords which generate traffic and conversions, try to use modifiers that are appropriate for your niche. If you run a business that sells on a large scale, modifiers such as the words ‘wholesaler’ or ‘retailer’ can help you find your ideal client. People looking for quality use modifiers such as ‘best’ or ‘elegant,’ while those looking for the best price use ‘cheap’ or ‘discount’ to find your product.
You can more strategically target a specific location by narrowing down your keyword research to specific towns, counties, or states in the Google Keyword Planner, or evaluate "interest by subregion" in Google Trends. Geo-specific research can help make your content more relevant to your target audience. For example, you might find out that in Texas, the preferred term for a large truck is “big rig,” while in New York, “tractor trailer” is the preferred terminology.

If we do a search for “chili recipe” on Pinterest, they’ll give us a related search bar. See all those colored boxes with single words? These words help you build keyword phrases to use in your blog post and Pinterest marketing! Try tacking on keywords by clicking the boxes until Pinterest gives you no more suggestions. This will give you a super-detailed longtail keyword that you can use in your pin description.
Long tail keywords are the low hanging fruit of keyword research. These are phrases with low competition, and generally low search volume as well. While any individual long tail keyword might not attract a ton of organic traffic, targeting them en masse can be an easy way to quickly pick up steam in your niche and poise yourself for tackling more competitive search terms.
A site has navigational issues, when it does not channel down traffic to relevant pages in a transparent and obvious manner. This can happen when your messages are not clean enough and you do not drive the click. It also happens if you are attempting to rank a content page for a keyword and don't lead the user to the conversion page where they terminate their search intent.
You can find broken internal links from within the Search Console. You need to attend to each warning appropriately telling Google that you have fixed it. Having excessive 404s will hurt your site if they are really 404s, because anyone could escalate the 404s by pointing randomly to pages that don't exist from external places, which is why this is not that big of a deal - but should be looked at.
Keyword research can also lead to great ideas for your business, services and overall marketing strategy. Keywords can be a window into understanding what your customers need. In this regard, your content strategy is about more than gaming the search engines. Keyword research is about connecting with your audience. If you ground your research in knowing your customers, the results can aid you in providing better products and services and increasing your brand loyalty.
If the pages you’ve created don’t rank for the keywords you’ve selected, you should re-evaluate your content strategy and adjust. If your page isn’t generating organic traffic, focus on less competitive keywords. Unfortunately in reality this is pretty common. The good thing is, you’ve collected a lot of actual keyword data at this stage. Adjust your keyword strategy and use this data in your advantage.      

Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.
There is a myriad of search algorithm updates, erratic market trends, increase in competition, among other things, all the more reason for you to be always on the move. With the help of the different tools that you can easily access with just a google searc>h away, all of these can be done in a snap. If you are committed to these practices, SEO ranking would just be a light feather on your workload.
For example Amazon as compared to a smaller niche Ecommerce website. Amazon does not need a blog to promote its content, the product landing pages alone do the trick and it does not need to funnel down traffic because of its already existing authority and the fact that thousands and millions of affiliates are promoting and bloggers are already writing about the products that get listed - and also that the reviews on the product pages form some fantastic content.
Some generic words like flowers, for example, may be associated with a wide variety of ideas, images, concepts and instructions. The extent of this term matches very little (or no) market demand, but what happens if I forgot that tomorrow is my wife’s birthday? Urgent search appears for emergency needs. Instead of searching for ‘flowers’ or ‘flowers delivery’ I could look for ‘flowers delivery 24hs’ or ‘flowers delivery same day'.
Long tail keywords are the low hanging fruit of keyword research. These are phrases with low competition, and generally low search volume as well. While any individual long tail keyword might not attract a ton of organic traffic, targeting them en masse can be an easy way to quickly pick up steam in your niche and poise yourself for tackling more competitive search terms.

What’s the point of creating a website if Google and users can’t access its content? It’s incredibly important to check everything from your robots meta tags to robots.txt file to XML sitemaps and more. It’s highly recommended to check the robots.txt and robots meta tags since they usually restrict access to certain areas of your site. Just be sure to check them manually and ensure that everything is in good shape.


By quality of the post we are basically talking about the overall authority and ability to engage. A post with low quality will eventually get lower engagement levels by users and that signal will be passed down to Google eventually - that will result in loss of overall quality score of the site. Churning out content that is put out for the sake of driving blog post numbers and not the users - is a failing strategy.

What these Google suggestions are based on is real content that lives on the web. Google is trying to connect searchers with the content they might be looking for. As a marketer, this is helpful to you because it shows you what already exists out there in the niches where you operate, and if you don’t have content on those topics yet, maybe you should.
Checking if your site is indexed properly is essential. You can do this inside Search Console. You need to make sure that all your pages are crawled and indexed and that you don't have any 404 errors or other page indexing issues - which includes the AMP (Accelerated Mobile Page) indexing issues - should you already have submitted your AMP powered site for the mobile index.
I just have the free version right now so I don't know all that the pro one can do. But even the free version has A LOT of tools you can use, I haven't even figured them all out yet. But one that I have used is their Content Optimizer. You can take a new or existing content piece of yours, and compare it to one of your competitor's pieces on a similar topic, and see where you might be lacking based on the keywords that are used in each piece.
Keyword research should be included in a larger marketing strategy to identify your target audience and predict customer behavior. Every marketing strategy should begin with knowing your audience. To identify which keywords will most effectively attract web traffic, you need to predict how your customers will utilize search. Forecasting how your customers will behave starts with knowing who your customers are. What are their demographics? What do they care about? What are they looking for that relates to your business? Once you know who you’re targeting, the web offers a treasure-trove of information you can use in your keyword research.

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Checking if your site is indexed properly is essential. You can do this inside Search Console. You need to make sure that all your pages are crawled and indexed and that you don't have any 404 errors or other page indexing issues - which includes the AMP (Accelerated Mobile Page) indexing issues - should you already have submitted your AMP powered site for the mobile index.
For sure there is much more under the hood with Jaaxy than just keywords, I use the rank checker quite a bit to see the trends on each search engine to get an idea of how they process my posts, it really helps, and you can set it to update twice a week for rank checks so it keeps you up to date. Yes the free portion is fabulous, as people can get a good idea of what is available and still get good results. 30 free searches can bang out some great content potential. This new Jaaxy 3.0 as I call it, is loaded and continues to offer all you need for online data information and SEO. It is the only tool I need, which saves cost.
They also seem to be getting this wrong often enough that I've got less confidence that the keywords that make up these groups really belong there. I recently tried to check the volume for the keyword [active monitoring] (the practice of checking on a network by injecting test traffic and seeing how it's handled, as opposed to passive monitoring) and the Keyword Planner gave me the volume for [activity monitor] (aka Fitbit).

Hey Alex – this is a good question. No tool is going to be spot on. My advice is to not look too much into the accuracy of the metrics, but look at it more as a relative measure. I’m finding Ahrefs to be a good barometer for keyword competitiveness, but I’ve also heard great things about KW Finder lately. I think it’ll more come to personal preference. Both are solid options.
Once I have a list of phrases, rankings, and volumes from these tools, I'll look to internal tools (maybe Excel, Access, or another database) to organize, classify, and forecast opportunity. This is where I'll estimate a competitor's traffic based on volume & position CTR, set goals for a target position, and estimate traffic based off that position's CTR and keyword volume.
If we do a search for “chili recipe” on Pinterest, they’ll give us a related search bar. See all those colored boxes with single words? These words help you build keyword phrases to use in your blog post and Pinterest marketing! Try tacking on keywords by clicking the boxes until Pinterest gives you no more suggestions. This will give you a super-detailed longtail keyword that you can use in your pin description.
Basically, Google shows the autocomplete suggestions whenever you start typing anything into Google search box. It is in Google's best interest to show the most relevant keywords in the autocomplete suggestions. Keywords that would help Google to retrieve the most relevant websites and help users find the most relevant content for their search query.
This will instruct search engines to avoid this specific link. The attributes found above helps define the relationship that a page or content has with the link it is tagged with. Nofollow links are mostly used in blogs or forum comment because this deems spammers powerless. This was created to make sure that inserting links is not abused by those who buy links or sell them for their gain. As a webmaster, it is your job to check your pages for these links. Inspect the code and see if the links are tagged with its corresponding follow or nofollow attribute. 
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