We also have a very unique “Local Search” only keyword search that cross references the populations of all towns and cities in USA, Canada & UK. So you can put in a search like “plumber” then choose to see all the cities in “California” with a population of between 50k – 100k and it will spit out plumber suggestions attached to the locale. Pretty neat.
You likely have a few keywords in mind that you would like to rank for. These will be things like your products, services, or other topics your website addresses, and they are great seed keywords for your research, so start there! You can enter those keywords into a keyword research tool to discover average monthly search volume and similar keywords. We’ll get into search volume in greater depth in the next section, but during the discovery phase, it can help you determine which variations of your keywords are most popular amongst searchers.
I will be creating a resources page with a massive set of links to the best tools. Please do subscribe to get the alert when I post it. I’ll also put up my live audit series shortly on my new Youtube Channel. That has a ton of stuff in it! There’s some neat look over the shoulder audits. A lot of the stuff has to be done manually and by just using a handful of tools. You don’t need too many weapons!
Jaaxy is for real and here to stay. Stay on top of the board with this tool. There are many keyword tools online and some are very good, however, most provide useless data that is hard to understand. Jaaxy gives you key elements needed to find your niche market. Traffic, Competition and SEO success possibility. those three elements alone are driving factors to know what to market and will save you hours of research time. I recommend getting going on Jaaxy and finding the training videos and watch them. They really show what this tool can do. Jaaxy is developed and managed by the owners of Wealthy Affiliate so the information works as designed in order to help anyone be successful in an online business
Anjali, I think you should start with the Keyword Planner from Google. As a free option it is one of the best. SEMRush is great but you need to pay for it to be really effective. After GKP (Google Keyword Planner) I would also take a look at the other, more unknown suggestions Ankit talked about like KWFinder or Keyword Eye – they are quite good and will sometimes reveal keywords you wouldn’t find otherwise (for free).
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As for duplicate content, Google gets confused when you create and publish articles with similar content, and this eventually leads to indexation issues. Keyword cannibalization happens when the owner focuses his effort on ranking for a particular keyword from several different pages. When this happens, Google won’t acknowledge multiple pages; they’ll only focus on the best one thus making the other ones useless and inaccessible to search engines.
This is something I’ll admit that I’ve done in the past – just assumed that ‘these are the keywords consumers must be using’, but keyword research tools have shown a plethora of terms that I certainly wouldn’t have managed to come up with, and I agree that as the language of products evolve, we should do regular checks to ensure we’re keeping up with that evolution.
2) SEMrush- This tool offers fantastic competitive research around domains to find what keywords could be driving traffic for your competitors. Looking at paid keywords ad spend can also help you know which keywords might have monetary value worth pursuing organically. If a competitor is willing to spend a high ad budget on terms and you think they do a good job running their ad campaign, then its a good indication it is worth organic ranking effort.
I recently decided to go with ahrefs after using spyfu for a couple years and trialing secockpit. I was a moz client for awhile too about a year ago. I found spyfu data to be sketchy (or just plain wrong) fairly often, and moz, I don’t know, just didn’t seem like they were really into supporting what I wanted to know. secockpit was achingly slow for a trickle of data. ahrefs isn’t nearly so graph-y as spyfu, but they are so blazing fast and the data is so deep. I enjoy it a great deal, even if it is spendy.
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